Download Colonial India in Children's Literature
Colonial India in Children's Literature (Epub & Pdf)

Overview :

Colonial India in Children's Literature by Supriya Goswami Details

Colonial India in Children's Literature is the first study along the book to explore the intersections of children's literature and identify historical moments in colonial India. By dealing with important…

Colonial India in Children's Literature synopsis

Colonial India in Children's Literature is the first study along the book to explore the intersections of children's literature and identify historical moments in colonial India. By dealing with important theoretical and critical literature that deals with colonialism, domination, and marginalization in children's literature, Goswami suggests that British, Anglo-Indian and Bengali children's literature responds to five major historical events: the missionary debates that preceded the Charter Act of 1813, the defeat of Tipu Sultan, the Rebellion of 1857, The birth of Indian nationalism, and the Swadeshi movement resulting from the division of Bengal in 1905. Through studying the works of Mary Sherwood (1775-1851), Barbara Hovland (1770-1844)), Sarah Janet Duncan (1861-1922), Rudyard Kipling (1865-1936) ), Abendrakeshur Rai (1863-1915), and Sukumar Rai (1887-1923), Goswami examines how children's literature negotiates and represents these important historical forces that did not stabilize Britain's imperial ambitions in India. Goswami argues that the texts of British and Anglo-Indian children in the nineteenth century reflect two different moods in the British colonial project in India. Sherwood and Hoveland (writing before 1857) use the metaphors of transformation and families as a way to awaken children to the dangers of India, while Duncan and Kipling shift the focus to combat prowess, adaptability, and empirical knowledge as defining adjectives in English and English.

Indian children. Moreover, Goswami's analysis of early nineteenth-century children's texts written by Women Writers re-preoccupies with male authors and adventure stories of boys that largely sparked discussions of events in the context of colonial India. This pioneering book also seeks to open up the canon by examining the texts of early 20th century Bengali children whose literary inspiration not only draws literary inspiration from British children's literature of the nineteenth century, but whose themes are also shaped by the Empire..



Please don't review this Book if you received a freebie for writing this review, or if you're connected in any way to the owner.